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Bechdel-ing my work

I made myself a promise that anything I wrote longer than than ten minutes was going to pass the Bechdel Test. It is not a very high bar to include at least two female characters who talk to each other about the point of the story/something besides a man, so I am determined to do it. I have succeeded since I instituted this rule, which includes all Mrs. Hawking stories, Mrs. Loring, The Tailor at Loring's End, Puzzle House Blues, and Adonis. Heh, Adonis only has one speaking male character period, a fact with which I am extremely pleased.

For the record, I do not believe that the presence/lack thereof of female characters in storytelling is a reliable indicator of whether the piece evidences a feminist or sexist worldview. I think you can usually tell through observation whether a story exists in a universe where women are viewed as complete people. I have seen plenty of stories with female characters that do not meet that metric, and even some with all male characters that do. I've written some of the latter, specifically in the standalone scene or ten-minute form, so I seriously hope that comes through.

But do not mistake me. There are ENOUGH all-male, or too-many-male, casts out there at this point that I think it's almost uniformly preferable to make an effort to include more women. I know sometimes you imagine a piece a certain way and it needs to be that way; I've been there, I get it. I respect authorial vision probably more than most other Angry Media Critic Feminists. But I also believe that so-called "authorial vision" is sometimes influenced by our prejudices more than we realize. We are all socialized to see Straight White Men as our default center of the story, and sometimes the stories for other people don't spring to our minds because we just don't see them as having stories worth telling. That is something all artists need to make an effort to GET OVER. And sometimes getting over it means consciously deciding to make a character a woman (or some other figure underrepresented in fiction) in order to start changing our ingrained assumptions.

I thought of this because it occurred to me that my Cabin Pressure fan ficton that I've been noodling on may technically pass, but only on a technicality. It's challenging in this case because what of what I've chosen to write about-- someone else's cast of four main characters, only one of whom is a woman, those characters specifically talking about romance, the setting is self-contained where the only other characters present are a horrible nasty couple that is fighting with each other. Even if those two female characters talk to each other, it's tough to not make the subject in that context a man. So I do understand that sometimes it's not as easy as it should be. But I don't want this to be my first piece of substantial length (a runtime of about thirty minutes) to fail since I made my vow. So I am going to make sure it passes legitimately before it's finished.

As we write the Adonis sequels, I figure we'll probably EVENTUALLY have to include another speaking male character. If we do, I kind of want to make them fail the reverse Bechdel Test. If there has to be more than one male character, they won't talk to each other, and if they do, it won't be about something besides a woman. 😝

Comments

( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
khyros
Dec. 1st, 2014 11:06 pm (UTC)
Snow white and the huntsman fails the reverse bechdel test.
breakinglight11
Dec. 4th, 2014 02:54 am (UTC)
That's awesome, I should see that. :-)
khyros
Dec. 4th, 2014 04:11 am (UTC)
You really shouldn't -- That is it's only redeeming feature
jducoeur
Dec. 7th, 2014 10:24 pm (UTC)
We are all socialized to see Straight White Men as our default center of the story, and sometimes the stories for other people don't spring to our minds because we just don't see them as having stories worth telling. That is something all artists need to make an effort to GET OVER.

Yep. Trying to internalize this for myself is part of why A Respectful Calm is being written gender-neutral for all characters for whom this seems reasonable: if a character's gender isn't integral to that character's story, I'm specifically leaving it open until casting. It's not by any means unusual nowadays, but very much a change from the way things worked when I started writing. Works out better than I expected: only five of the player characters look like they need to be written gendered.

(And one of those -- the "girlfriend" character -- arguably doesn't, but leads to the killer at the center of the story potentially being gay, and I'm not certain I want to go there. Still mulling that bit, and might yet decide to *intentionally* go there, and switch the "girlfriend" to male: it makes the story a bit sadder and more biting. Still trying to decide whether that's going to squick people, though...)
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )

About Me

My name is Phoebe. I'm Boston area theater professional and English professor focused in writing, acting, directing, and modeling. I'm known for having lots of interests, lots of opinions about those interests, and a very high estimation of the value thereof. This blog is for talking about whatever's on my mind, from my daily life to my activities to musing on any number of abstract topics. Thanks for taking the time to read.

My productions:

Upcoming Productions:



MRS. HAWKING part 2 and 3


at the Watch City Steampunk Festival 2016

presented by The Chameleon's Dish

Vivat Regina
by Phoebe Roberts

at 2PM

and

Base Instruments
by Phoebe Roberts

at 6PM

Saturday, May 13th 2017
at 274 Moody Street, Waltham, MA

Other Achievements:

"The Tailor at Loring's End" screenplay
Quarter Finalist in the Final Draft Big Break Screenwriting Competition 2013

"Adonis" screenplay
Top Ten Percent in the Bluecat Screenwriting Contest 2015

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